Critters and Cocktails : A Lecture Series at CBEC
January – April 2018

Join us for the 2018 season, which will feature a series of talks on wildlife of the Chesapeake Bay Region.

The program will be held in CBEC’s Education Building in Grasonville, MD.  The lectures will be held on Wednesdays with refreshments & beverages starting at 6:30pm  and the actual presentation from
7-7:45pm.  Cost will be $10/session for CBEC Members; $15/session for Non-Members.  SAVE Money by prepaying for all 4 sessions!

Online registration is  highly encouraged as we are due to sell out!  SAVE YOUR SPOT!

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Wednesday, January 24th    Jean-Francois Therrien:  Winter Migrants…Snowy Owls and More!

The presentation will review recent results from Hawk Mountain Sanctuary’s research program, with an emphasis on Arctic raptors. The audience will witness how we manage to monitor those highly mobile and unpredictable predatory birds throughout consecutive years via a slide show depicting field work situations.

Ph.D. Biology. Joined Hawk Mountain in 2011.
After completing an academic internship with Hawk Mountain in the fall of 2002, JF returned nine years later as Senior Research Biologist. He now leads the Sanctuary’s research projects in the Arctic and is also involved in several studies including the movement ecology of New World Vultures and Peregrine Falcons across the Americas.

When he’s not monitoring the long-term American kestrel nest-box program or helping with the migration counts from the Sanctuary’s lookout, JF can be found teaching statistics to Sanctuary trainees and enjoying life with his wife and two young children.

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Wednesday, February 21st  Judy Wink:  Coyotes, Friend or Foe?

This presentation will be delivered in a dynamic “storytelling” format that only Judy Wink can master!  She will describe the natural history of the Coyote while delineating between the Eastern and Western species.  You will enjoy learning the many interesting facts about coyotes while on this journey of discovering if they are considered friend or foe?

While earning undergraduate and master’s degrees in education, wildlife biology, environmental studies, and wildlife management administration,  Judy Wink kept an eye out for ways she could make a difference in society and the environment. Becoming professionally involved in the education and conservation fields, pushing green products and green systems for sustainability, and nurturing her lifelong passion of ornithology kept her focused and on course.

Spanning four decades, Wink’s work brought her to a number of Pennsylvania locales where she held positions at conservation and environmental education centers. She also taught in the Pennsylvania public school system and at Cedar Crest College in Allentown. In 1995, Wink founded The Habitat Works, Inc., which provides consulting expertise for hazardous waste cleanup and disposal. She still serves as the corporation’s president and CEO.

In her current position as Executive Director at the CBEC, Wink oversees the 510-acre preserve—a magnificent montage of wetlands, marshes, meadows, and woodlots while continuing to educate people of all ages on topics of nature and the outdoors.

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Wednesday, March 7th Dr. John Morrissey:  Sharks of the Bay!   Who, Where, and Why?

Chesapeake Bay is home to more than two dozen species of sharks and rays.  This slide-illustrated lecture will explore their diversity and anatomy, their amazing sensory systems, some very surprising aspects of their reproduction, and a summary of how dangerous they are to us, and how dangerous we are to them.  The primary objective of this lecture will be to demonstrate that most “common knowledge” about sharks is wrong.

Professor Morrissey, a lifetime member of the American Elasmobranch Society, studies the natural history of sharks, skates and rays, including the description of new species and the investigation of their reproduction, feeding ecology, age and growth, visual adaptations, and more have taken him from the Gulf of Maine to Jamaica, from the Bahamas to Japan, and from Long Island Sound to Norfolk Canyon.  Most recently, he and his students study the cownose rays in Chesapeake Bay and chain catsharks in his lab.  He is also the lead author of the bestselling textbook “Introduction to the Biology of Marine Life” published through Jones & Bartlett Learning.

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Wednesday, April 18th  Shannon Pederson:  Bats, Busting the Bat Myths

​Bats and Tequilla…DO mix! Bats comprise 1/4 of all mammals and consume a variety of food items from pests​ that damage crops to fruits and even fish. They range in size from smaller than your pinky to a 6 foot wingspan. Shannon Pederson, PhD student at University of Maryland, will discuss the natural history of these diverse animals and will demonstrate the equipment used to catch them, track their movements, and study their behavior.
Shannon Pederson’s Education:
  • Ph.D., anticipated 2018, University of Maryland, College Park, MD
  • Master’s of Natural Resources, 2004, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, National Capital Region, Falls Church, VA
  • Bachelor of Science, 1999, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
Shannon Pederson’s Current Research:

My PhD research focuses on evaluating bat activity and species composition changes in a White Nose Syndrome-positive region to determine urbanization’s effects. The WNS-causing fungus thrives in cold and humid environments. Interestingly, the role of urbanization, which creates warmer and drier climates due to its “heat island effect,” has not been investigated. I hypothesize that with the appropriate combination of landscape features, urban areas within a WNS-positive region could serve as quality habitat for bats.

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